Tiprod

Chefkirk - Tax Cuts For Nose Jobs, Reviews

Tax Cuts for Nose Jobs

Out on SNSE

This is a 9 track CDR. It's an eclectic collection of Noise experiments, found sounds, cut up, harsh textures, ambient drones, rhythmic loops and various other odds and ends. Some of this comes off as a bit on the quirky side, based on the squirting and snorking (I know that isn't a word) nature of the sounds, at others it seems more straight forward. There is some nice work here, and I like a lot of the sounds, squirting or otherwise, because there is a precision to them. They are sharp and distinct, and even though many of them seem to be processed similarly, that clarity in the mix is a nice way to let the character of the project come through. There is a lot of ground covered here, ranging from minimalism to pretty dense, and it is all woven together pretty cohesively. I've seen some good reactions to other releases from this project and now understand why, in addition to being impressed that it is actually different than a lot of the stuff you see praised for seemingly no reason. - Scott (Worm Gear Zine)

It's a good thing that I check my post office box regularly else I might get crushed by the sheer volume of Chefkirk releases that seem to come my way. While it's not the brightest plan to get everything from a single supplier when the quality level is consistently at the level of a slick German car commercial it's certainly hard to resist looking deeply and longingly into each of the gift horse's orifices. "Tax Cuts for Nose Jobs" comes to us via committed noise purveyors SNSE and sports a demure cardboard slip case with a cool 3 colour silkscreen of a chopping surgeon and his noseless patrons. The CDR inside coughs up 9 tracks which logically due to their pure noise nature have oh so delightful non-sequitur titles like "ANIMAL product COLON" and "Oxlike GUAR (cloned)". I guess with thematically unspecific noise anything much more directed would be even more pretentious so if they can pull a puzzled look or a chuckle out of me go nuts I say.

Surface crap taken care of, this release is firmly planted in the same set of pots I have come to expect Chefkirk to be spooning his aural compost into. It's all scrappy, rambunctious noise that sounds like it has been created via some strange custom analog / digital hybrid computer that you have to pump to get running and program by emulating modem noises with your mouth and armpits. Once started though, the only way to stop this infernal machine from spewing out the fractured flatlander screech of ones, zeroes and slipping drive belts is to promise it that you will finance its next musical release. Which is actually pretty likely to happen somewhere, sometime since everything that it spurts force seems to be graced by a novel stickiness that is akin to the miracle bubble of angelic protection that surrounds drunks out on a dangerously stupid midnight mission of some sort.

Alright, you want some specifics I presume. Well, if you could make a digital combustion engine with the idle speed controlled by something as unstable-y stable as as a "Weeble" then you would have yourself the core instrument used here. Whiiirrrr-kk-kk-kk-put-put via squared off oscillators careening about into stuttering drum hits that send glycerine like pseudo cracks spidering off through glassy reverberation treatments. When not revving like an embarrassed, overcompensating redneck pretending he meant to scrape that telephone pole, warbling drones lift themselves above swells of filtered noise leaving the undulating fields of earthen swoosh behind as they ascend to their air raid siren final destination. Also in the emulation list can be found straight up modem skree but here it feels like watching 35mm slides on machine gun like rapid-fire - some part of you can make out a ghostly image of a geek flipping your the bird but it's gone so fast that you only register the grinning teeth of the clattering digital ratatat.

Despite the rawer elements this is actually a surprisingly warm album, like an afghan from your crazy grandmother crocheted out of angora wool and discarded IDE cables. While a short 26 minutes or so it leaves you comfortably full and at the risk of sounding like a Nintendo style fanboy I must say that much like everything Roger Smith has so far spit in my direction, it grabs the attention and will not let go until it is done. Top drawer noise music.
Moron, Industrial.org

TAX CUTS FOR NOSE JOBS
(SNSE)
(9 tracks, 25:52)
This time out Chefkirk offers up nine tracks in a mere 26 minutes, making for a quick flurry of glitchy electronic noise that's a bit louder and brighter in output volume than some of the other work I've heard from the project. Stylistically, however, a wide range of noise is still offered up, again proving to me that this project exemplifies a literal definition of "experimental noise" quite well. "Peasant Farmers" is a generally softer and more ambient sort of piece, whereas others along the lines of the brief "Millions of Chickens" get more acerbic, or there's "Oxlike-Guar (Cloned)" which is rather obscure. "Carbon Dioxide Sequestration" is among the longer and more balanced pieces, chaotically fusing weird electronic textures with some unusual feedback and aggressive (though not truly harsh) midrange movement. Another long piece, "Animal Product Colon", takes one of the most minimal roads, with some dry hums softly manifesting themselves as quick bursts of volume punch forth at times. The consistency and gradual pacing of this composition keep it at a more atmospheric level for me, and I find it to be among the strongest offerings of this disc. "Avo-Reuben" gets significantly thicker and more menacing with its biting clarity of distortion and glitchy undercurrents - again, not harsh, but definitely more of an attack here. Very nice, the quality of sound makes a huge impact with this one. Excellent packaging here, too. The CD-R comes in a slim white cardboard slipcase with three colors (orange, yellow, and black) screenprinted onto it - showing icons of smiling faces, a doctor, and some other designs/minimal text. The face of the disc has similar artwork printed directly onto it as well. Great stuff, it really looks very nice. I'm still not totally into this style of noise, but at its best Chefkirk's work really is quite interesting. This is the best release I've experienced from the project to date, so I'm still intrigued.
Andrew, Fall Of Because

TAX CUTS FOR NOSE JOBS
(SNSE)
More music by Roger Smith, aka Chefkirk, who apperentely knows more small CDR labels than anyone else does in this world. In a rather short (twenty six minutes) release he rambles through nine slabs of rhythmical noise. The noise element in Chefkirk's work is always present, but more so than before he adds glitchy rhythmical stuff to his music, that brings him close to the work of say Pan Sonic meeting Merzbow. Nowhere close to being dance music of course, but nevertheless I thought this was one of the best Chefkirk releases I heard so far. There seems to be put some thought in the seperate tracks and they are kept to the right length to carry out the ideas they have. Short but to the point. Way to go for Chefkirk.
Frans de Waard, Vital Weekly

Tax Cuts for Nose Jobs
(SNSE)

An album which offers you an overdose of riffing lurches along to an clanking industrial hi-voltage electrocution. Chefkirk combines elements of grindcore and underground ambient influences with a considered ease that makes this record one impressive release.

Chefkirk wants to destroy the very ground you are standing on. Ignore it and your peril.
GIAG

Tax Cuts for Nose Jobs
7/10 - [SNSE]
This time out Chefkirk offers up nine tracks in a mere 26 minutes, making for a quick flurry of glitchy electronic noise that's a bit louder and brighter in output volume than some of the other work I've heard from the project. Stylistically, however, a wide range of noise is still offered up, again proving to me that this project exemplifies a literal definition of "experimental noise" quite well. "Peasant Farmers" is a generally softer and more ambient sort of piece, whereas others along the lines of the brief "Millions of Chickens" get more acerbic, or there's "Oxlike-Guar (Cloned)" which is rather obscure. "Carbon Dioxide Sequestration" is among the longer and more balanced pieces, chaotically fusing weird electronic textures with some unusual feedback and aggressive (though not truly harsh) midrange movement. Another long piece, "Animal Product Colon", takes one of the most minimal roads, with some dry hums softly manifesting themselves as quick bursts of volume punch forth at times. The consistency and gradual pacing of this composition keep it at a more atmospheric level for me, and I find it to be among the strongest offerings of this disc. "Avo-Reuben" gets significantly thicker and more menacing with its biting clarity of distortion and glitchy undercurrents - again, not harsh, but definitely more of an attack here. Very nice, the quality of sound makes a huge impact with this one. Excellent packaging here, too. The CD-R comes in a slim white cardboard slipcase with three colors (orange, yellow, and black) screenprinted onto it - showing icons of smiling faces, a doctor, and some other designs/minimal text. The face of the disc has similar artwork printed directly onto it as well. Great stuff, it really looks very nice. I'm still not totally into this style of noise, but at its best Chefkirk's work really is quite interesting. This is the best release I've experienced from the project to date, so I'm still intrigued. Running time - 25:52, Tracks: 9 [Notable tracks: H5N1, Animal Product Colon, Avo-Reuben]
Aversion Online

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