niko skorpio  [some place else]

www.someplaceelse.net   niko@someplaceelse.net

 

- please introduce your self. tell us who you are, what were and what are interests in your life

I'm Niko Skorpio Sirkia. Music as been my biggest inspiration and reason-to-live for as long as I can remember.
I used to be a heavy metal kid in the 80's (I guess I'm still a heavy metal kid, just an old and grumpy one) starting from Kiss, Motorhead and Iron Maiden and digging deeper and deeper in search of some kind of dark and heavy essence of sound.
In the beginning of the 90's my sonic world view exploded as I discovered post-industrial groups such as Sigillum S, Coil, Lustmord, Godflesh and many others (not to forget a bunch of gothic bands such as Fields of the Nephilim and Christian Death). Then I obviously realized metal wasn't at all the darkest nor the heaviest kind of music around. A whole new world of experimental electronic music opened for me to explore and experience, and I'm still on that trip I guess.
So, making music and running a record label are quite obvious choices. Besides that I do all kinds of things related to graphic arts & design, photography, drawing, painting etc.

- when and why did u start some place else

Some Place Else was formed in 1997 on top of my previous label Demonosound which I had kept running since 1992/93 or so. I needed a channel for my music and art as well as for other likeminded artists, with the total freedom to do whatever you want. I'm very much a do-it-yourself type person and I like to take care of all kinds of things from the seminal creative process to album cover design to mailorder and so forth. I've been doing this for so long that I haven't really asked why in ages. It's just something I do because I enjoy it so much.

- why exactly some place else. what it means

Those who'se seen Twin Peaks by David Lynch may remember "the other place". I was a huge David Lynch fan back then (I still am!) and when looking for a suitable name for the label, Twin Peaks definitely had some influence over it.
Some Place Else is a place for... something else. Some Place Else is a state of mind, a temporary (come permanent?) autonomous zone outside known time and space. It may have its own laws, just so that they, too, can be broken.
The name refers to the creative process - I think music and other kinds of creative ideas and work come from some place else. I have no idea why I have some sound or a piece of melody or some lines of text running around in my head or where they came from, but then I have no choice but to capture it and bring it to material world for others to hear. Or when I'm just fooling around with my gear, suddenly something happens and the sounds start to take a form and personality.

- what is the style that some place else release and what is the criterion in releasing stuff. what is the principle that you use in choosing projects and sound for releasing

First, I will have to like it of course. I don't want to be stuck to one particular genre, but loosely speaking I can say we work in the fields of experimental electronic music (which doesn't really tell anything, does it?). I also want to know my artists personally, to make sure we have similar enough goals and motivation. I think a certain attitude is essential. All the current artists are more or less close friends of mine, so I'm happy to be able to call us a kind of a family (very loosely speaking of course).

- you are making music under your name. how can you define your music, if you can and if you want to do that

I make lots of different kinds of stuff so it depends on a particular track. But I think everything I do has a certain vibe to it that ties these different elements together. More "pop"-oriented people tend to view my music as experimental, weird etc., but on the other hand I like to use my voice and some traditional song-structures etc., things that some experimentally oriented ones seem to consider heresy.
Anyway, I think I make songs just like you could say Tom Waits makes songs, or Celtic Frost make songs, or Pizzicato 5, or whoever.
Everything has a meaning. The songs have varying themes and ideas. Mostly they reflect the ways I see and experience the world.
Technically, most of my work is based on sampling, cut-ups and such. I like the idea of sampling, recontextualization. You take a piece of a puzzle and place it in a whole different environment. It brings along something from its original source but the new picture forms a different whole. I prefer using sources that are as far apart from the kinds of stuff I do as possible. Just for diversity.

- you are living in finland one of countries that raised its music scene in last couple of years. much good artists and labels appeared. what is your attitude about finland scene as artist and as consumer

I don't know that many people in the Finnish scene(s) but about those I do know I can say I'm happy to be in contact with them. They seem nice, motivated and dedicated to things they're up to. I may be a bit disconnected from the Finnish activity because I live in Turku and most of the stuff happens in Helsinki.
In general I think I have more international than local contacts. Since the Internet it doesn't really matter where you live, you can easily collaborate with people who live on the other side of the planet.

- what is your attitude about cdr labels that are more present last couple of years after this fast technology development. what is the difference between regular label, cdr label or even mp3 label

In theory, there is no difference, good music is good music and it doesn't really matter what kind of physical form (if any) it takes. In practise, CDr's and mp3's don't take as much effort as pressing CD or vinyl at a plant, which is good in the way that pretty much everyone can do it without investing a whole lot of money in it.
The next argument would be that because everybody can do it there's so much shit around. But who's to tell what's shit and what isn't? For the consumer/listener, it means more work to weed out the good stuff (ie, whatever s/he happens to like) from the rest. But I can deal with that as long as I don't have to stick with boring major label garbage. Lots of fantastic music is released on CDr's and mp3 only, and without these formats I probably would've never heard them.

- there are many revivals happening in music styles last couple of years. does that means that music is in crisis after which will come something new. all that as permanent process. is this end of another music era or

I'm not sure what you mean with that. Well, someone told me acid house is back. I never noticed, but maybe that's just me as I don't really go out too often.
Myself, I retain my interest in for example some 80's music, and I'm sure these things influence me on many levels, but I'm more into looking forward than digging into the past. Sometimes something new will come out of that digging, but too often it's just imitating something already done and that's not very interesting in my opinion.

- do you have any idea about the sound of the future. will be there any new style in near or maybe more far future and how it will sound

Technically the options are nearly limitless which I obviously consider nice. I'd like to see a kind of a melting pot where different styles mix seamlessly into a chaotic whole from which new forms will constantly rise and mutate. Hmm, maybe I'm describing the present, now?

- is noise as a scene mainstream

I'm not sure if I understand this question. There's a saying, "Why do they call mainstream a stream? Because it's so shallow." It depends. I guess every scene has its shallow people and things, but you can concentrate on what you like and ignore the rest.
I don't think noise as a form of "music" can ever become mainstream as such, unless you can make it a 3-minute piece that Jack Average can whistle to. But is it then noise anymore?